Senior women enjoying petting her dog as a resident in a senior living community. When you’re touring an assisted living community (which we really do recommend), you’ll want to be sure to ask the right questions while you’re there.

But what are the right questions?

Often, whether we’re looking for ourselves or our loved one, we don’t know what questions to ask because we’ve never done this before. So, if you’re not sure what to ask, here’s a list of questions to ask when choosing an assisted living community—both of the community and yourself.

mac activities of daily living adlIs it time for your parent to move to an assisted living or long-term care community?

The answer to that question is never easy for an adult child to answer. It’s tough to know what to look for and how to evaluate your parent’s ability to live on their own. After all, you’re their child, not their doctor.

cost of in home careIs your parent having some trouble living independently at home? Are you starting to consider assisted living as an option?

If so, you’re probably like most adult children in Ohio who are in the same boat—you want to find the right care for your parent, but you want to know much each option is going to cost before you make any final decisions.

activities of daily livingActivities of daily living are the things people do every day, like eating, bathing or dressing.

That’s the short answer. The long one includes answers to questions like why activities of daily living (ADLs) matter and how they can help you tell what level of care your parent needs.

Here’s what you need to know about activities of daily living, without the confusing medical jargon.

tips for moving parents into assisted livingDear Stephanie:

We visited my mom in Columbus, Ohio over the weekend. Truth be told, I’m worried about her and have been for a while. At a minimum, she is lonely. She might even be depressed. Some of the other concerns I have are small, but I think they add up to a more serious decline in her health.

assisted living signsYou’ve noticed some changes in your parent. Maybe Mom isn’t dressing like she used to, or perhaps Dad no longer plays bridge even though he used to love it. But are these signs that it’s time for assisted living?

It can be difficult to tell whether your parent could benefit from assisted living or not. Here are four signs that it might be time to consider making the move.

macintosh assisted livingThe phrase “continuum of care” can mean something different depending on what field it’s referring to. When it comes to senior and assisted living, “continuum of care” refers to a comprehensive offering of services that can cover a variety of care needs seniors have.

MacIntosh assisted living communities are able to offer a continuum of care through rehab and skilled nursing services. Here’s why that matters when you’re choosing an assisted living community for your parent or loved one.

 downsizing for assisted livingWhen you’re preparing to make the move to an assisted living community, it can be a little intimidating to contemplate the downsizing process (also known as rightsizing). Many of us have lived in our homes for decades, which makes it difficult to imagine what our life will look like somewhere else.

senior physical therapy rehabYou’ve been through the hospitalization process and the transition to rehab with your loved one. You’ve helped your parent navigate their recovery journey, and now they’re back on their feet and ready to return home.

So now what?